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New distributors in Asia

Posted by Paul on 6 July 2015
Tags: distributors

To wrap up this round of distributor introductions, I would like to welcome the following new Pololu distributors in Asia:

NTREX, Inc. – Devicemart is an online electronics store in Incheon, South Korea, with a huge selection of components, prototyping equipment, robotics kits, 3D printers, PC components, and industrial supplies. We are excited to see that their Pololu category now lists hundreds of our parts. Devicemart is now our fourth Korean distributor.


Suzaku Lab, Ltd. is an online store based in Nara, Japan, specializing in robotics parts. Joining two other Japanese distributors, Suzaku is carrying an extensive selection of Pololu motion control boards, including the Jrk, Simple Motor Controller, and TReX lines as well as most of our stepper and DC motor driver breakout boards.


Coprime Pte Ltd, an electronics shop in Singapore, is now carrying Pololu products. We have not visited, but from the Facebook pictures of their storefront, it seems like Pololu parts are being displayed alongside an exciting array of other hobby electronics boards and parts. Coprime is our fourth Singaporean distributor and our second (!) located in Sim Lim Tower.


Explore Labs is an open-source electronics company in Jodhpur, India that has been writing tutorials and selling and designing boards since around 2011 (they are growing and recently rebuilt their website, so some old content is unavailable). They publish their hardware designs on GitHub and sell them on their site along with Arduino, Raspberry Pi, the Intel Edison, kits from 3D Robotics, and now Pololu parts.


Tanna Educational Services, another new Indian distributor in Rajkot, Gujarat, offers training services on topics including embedded development and also sells microcontroller-related boards, kits, and components on their website. Their Pololu category contains various regulators and motor drivers, several sensors, the Wixel, our USB AVR Programmer, and more. Tanna and Explore Labs bring us to a total of five Indian distributors.


See the full list of over 200 distributors to find one in your area.

New distributors in South America

Posted by Paul on 16 June 2015
Tags: distributors

Continuing with our belated new distributor introductions, we are happy to welcome these six new Pololu distributors in South America:

Baú da Eletrônica is a new Pololu distributor in São Paulo, Brazil. Check out their Pololu category for the 3pi Robot, Zumo, and more.


BUILDBOT, also in São Paulo, is now carrying the 3pi and Zumo as well as a variety of Pololu sensors, relay modules, and mechanical parts.


FILIPEFLOP is yet another new distributor in Brazil (bringing the total to eight), located in the city of Florianópolis. Make sure to check out their blog, which is full of useful-looking tutorials.


IMPORTRONIC, a robotics and electronics store in Quito, Ecuador, now features a Pololu category with a selection of our popular motors and servos.


Paruro.pe, in Lima, Peru, carries a large selection of electronics parts. Search for Pololu on their site to find our 3pi and Zumo, Arduino and Raspberry motor drivers, the Arduino-compatible A-Star Mini, and more.


Eneka is a new distributor with an interesting history. The store was founded by four brothers as a radio assembler/installer in Paris, France, and moved to Montevideo, Uruguay, in 1936 due to the deteriorating situation in Europe. Since then, they have become a distributor of electronics equipment and components, and they recently started adding robotics to their product line. Our first distributor in Uruguay, Eneka carries a number of Pololu parts including voltage regulators, sensors, motors, and wheels.

See the full list of over 200 distributors to find one in your area.

New distributors in Europe

Posted by Paul on 4 June 2015
Tags: distributors

Continuing to catch up on our new distributor introductions, we are excited to welcome these new European distributors:

Transfer Multisort Electronik (TME) is an electronics distributor based in Łódź, Poland, with local offices in six countries around Europe and a catalog of 145,000 products. Their robotics category is now full of Pololu products. Scroll down to the end of this post for a video of their warehouse, including an impressive 23-meter-high automated storage rack.


GoTronic runs an online store with a physical storefront in Blagny, France, near the Belgian border. They have been in business since 1990 and sell all kinds of robotics parts and kits and electronics components. Search for “Pololu” to find wheels, motors, the Zumo Robot Kit for Arduino, Maestros, motor drivers, and more.


OM ELECTRONIQUE is an electronics shop and online store located in Grenoble, France, selling all kinds of electronics items from audio/visual equipment to robotics parts. You can check out their two-page Pololu category.


MCHobby – Microcontroleur Hobby is an online electronics store operating out of Waterloo, Belgium. They have put a huge amount of effort into supporting customers in France and Belgium with detailed French-language documentation for the products they carry. For examples, check out their Zumo page or this DRV8825 carrier tutorial.


Flikto Elektronik distributes our products alongside items from places like Adafruit, Arduino, and Sparkfun. Located in Cologne, Germany, they offer same-day, low-cost shipping throughout Europe, including free shipping within Germany for orders over €50.


Floris.cc is a shop run by Pieter Floris in Breda, Netherlands, distributing all kinds of “electronic thingies”. They are carrying a variety of Pololu products including motors, motor drivers, Maestro servo controllers, and the zumo Robot for Arduino. I noticed that they also offer something I have not seen at other places: a €5.00 soldering service to help people without soldering experience.


SPACE d.o.o. is a hobby shop located on the grounds of the Belgrade Fair complex in Serbia, now carrying Pololu parts including the 3pi and Zumo Robot for Arduino.


MechaDroid is a new electronics and robotics shop in Cham, Switzerland, selling Pololu motors, motor drivers. and more.


Now, here is that cool video of TME’s warehouse:

See the full list of over 200 distributors to find one in your area.

Memorial Day weekend sale

Posted by Paul on 22 May 2015


Memorial Day weekend sale

We are having a big Memorial Day sale now through Monday, with discounts on over 600 products when you use the coupon code MEMORIALDAY15. Stock up on robot parts now so you can build cool things all summer long! Note that we will be closed on Monday, so orders will not ship until Tuesday, May 26.

For more information, including all of the sale items, see the sale page.

New high-current stepper driver carrier with SPI: AMIS-30543

Posted by Paul on 21 May 2015
Tags: new products
New high-current stepper driver carrier with SPI: AMIS-30543

This new board is a Pololu carrier for ON Semiconductor’s AMIS-30543 Micro-Stepping Motor Driver, which is a high-performance stepper motor driver with advanced features not found on our other stepper motor driver carriers.

AMIS-30543 stepper motor driver carrier, bottom view with dimensions.

The Pololu AMIS-30543 Stepper Motor Driver Carrier breaks out all of the important pins of the driver onto breadboard-compatible 0.1"-spaced pins, with optional terminal blocks for the power and motor connections and mounting holes for a more robust setup. Our board supplies reverse protection and all the necessary circuit components for interfacing to a microcontroller.

The AMIS-30543 is rated up to 30 V and 3 A, but (as with other stepper drivers) the current rating is a theoretical maximum assuming excellent cooling. Using our board at room temperature without a heatsink, the chip can practically supply about 1.8 A per coil, more than any of our other stepper motor driver carriers.

The SPI interface of the AMIS-30543 provides many exciting features: it lets you configure microstepping (down to 1/128-step), set the current limit, select voltage slopes, change direction, disable the outputs or put the driver to sleep, monitor the micro-step position and errors, and more. Please note, however, that you cannot step the motor over SPI.

Many of our customers have asked for software current limit control, since it allows better power management. For example, consider that stepper motors counter-intuitively use their maximum current when stopped, even if there is no holding torque required. This wastes a lot of power and generates undesirable heat in the drivers and motors. In a typical application like a 3D printer, where you don’t need much holding torque, you would want to reduce the current limit to a low value during pauses. You might use a higher limit (above the continuous limit) when accelerating and an intermediate value for constant-speed motion. The SPI current limit control on the AMIS-30543 lets you do all of this in your code.

Another advanced feature is the SLA (speed and load angle) output that indicates the level of the back-EMF voltage of the motor. This is an analog signal that can be used for stall detection or closed-loop control of the torque and speed:

AMIS-30543 stepper motor driver SLA output (green) and motor output (blue).

It is easy to get started using our Arduino library on GitHub, which provides basic functions for configuring and operating the driver as well as access to many of the advanced features. Please visit the product page for a detailed description, wiring diagrams, the AMIS-30543 datasheet, and more.

More new distributors

Posted by Paul on 21 May 2015
Tags: distributors

Core Electronics, in Adamstown, New South Wales, joins five other distributors in Australia and carries a wide variety of electronics parts for the maker community. Like fellow Australian distributor Little Bird Electronics, they take the approach of listing almost all of our products for sale, with shipping times depending on their on-site stock. This means that if you are in Australia and want some relatively obscure Pololu product like our Wires with Pre-crimped Terminals 2-Pack M-M 60" Purple you can get it without worrying about international shipping charges.


Studica, Inc. is a distributor of educational products, based in New York, with offices in Canada, Brazil, UK, Italy, Greece, Denmark, Hungary, and Australia. You can browse their entire Pololu category, which mainly includes our complete robots and robot kits.


CrustCrawler Robotics is a manufacturer of robotic arms, grippers, ROV parts, and walking robots in Gilbert, Arizona, USA. CrustCrawler – now our nearest distributor – is carrying our Maestro servo controllers, which they also include as a standard controller with some of their arm configuations.


We are happy to add BC Robotics Inc. to our list of Canadian distributors. BC Robotics is a distributor and manufacturer of electronic kits and parts that also helped found Makerspace Nanaimo just a block away from their office in Nanaimo, British Columbia. BC Robotics carries a variety of Pololu products and offers several flat-rate shipping options throughout Canada. Fun fact: their location in Nanaimo makes BC Robotics our westernmost distributor!

See the full list of over 200 distributors to find one in your area.

New distributors in Turkey

Posted by Paul on 11 May 2015
Tags: distributors

We have not been keeping up with announcing our new distributors on the blog, and I will be trying to catch up over the next week or two. To start with, I am excited to welcome two new Pololu distributors located in Istanbul, Turkey!

F1 Depo (officially Element Elektronik) lists a huge variety of development boards and parts with well-known brands like Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and XBee, but they also carry many products from smaller manufacturers and an assortment of generic components. You can browse their whole category of Pololu-sourced parts here.


Robot Kutusu (officially Robkut Robot Teknolojileri Elektronik ve Otomasyon) is a distributor of Arduino, Raspbery Pi, and many other electronics and robotics products. They are now carrying a number of Pololu products, including wheels, motors, stepper motors, and the Zumo and 3pi robots.

F1 Depo and Robot Kutusu join our five other Turkish distributors. See the full list of over 200 distributors to find one in your area.

New product: Zumo 32U4

Posted by Paul on 6 March 2015
Tags: new products
New product: Zumo 32U4

I am excited to announce the release of our new Zumo 32U4 Robot Kit, a complete Arduino-compatible robot kit based on the ATmega32U4. We have, in some sense, been working on this robot for about seven years.

One of our major long-term goals at Pololu is to be making complete robots, and many of the parts we make are stepping stones toward that goal. The first real step toward the Zumo started back in 2008, shortly after we started carrying our micro metal gearmotors, when we released the compatible wheels shown at right. The intent was that they could be used with either tires or tracks and optionally with encoders, and that eventually they would be a part of our own robot.

A few years later we had assembled enough parts to release the Zumo chassis. We planned to use this as the base for a complete robot, but by releasing it first as a component, we got to see the community do a lot of interesting things with it. (Check out this Raspberry Pi Zumo, for example.)

It was not until 2012 that we were able to announce a complete robot, the Zumo Robot Kit for Arduino, which combined all of these parts with a new board containing a boost regulator, motor drivers, and inertial sensors. The board works like an upside-down shield: you plug an Arduino onto the top of the robot. We released a compatible reflectance sensor array soon after that, making it possible to use the Zumo for everything from mini-sumo to maze-solving.

So we sort of had a new complete robot, but it was not quite complete enough for us, since it still required a separate Arduino, which we did not manufacture. Also, the upside-down shield configuration blocked a lot of space for expansion and prototyping, we lacked a good solution for obstacle/opponent sensing (that’s important for mini-sumo!), and we had received lots of requests for encoders, which are hard to squeeze into the available space. A lot of our effort in 2013 and 2014 went toward components that we thought could be used on a more complete Zumo, such as smaller quadrature encoders and 38 kHz IR proximity sensors. And developing our A-Star 32U4 line of Arduino-compatible controllers based on the ATmega32U4 helped integrate the Arduino functionality directly into the robot.

So finally we had all the pieces available to make a new, much more capable Zumo that would be completely Pololu, the Zumo 32U4 robot:

The Zumo 32U4 incorporates many features of the A-Star 32U4 Prime LV, including an ATmega32U4 microcontroller with an Arduino-compatible USB bootloader and a step-up/step-down voltage regulator system. There is a handy 8×2 character LCD on top and a buzzer for simple beeps and music. Like the Zumo Robot for Arduino, our kit includes dual motor drivers, a complete 9-axis IMU, and line sensors, but the new integrated quadrature encoders and proximity sensors make this a far more capable platform.

We are initially offering the Zumo 32U4 robot only as a kit. Soldering is required, and it is intended for more advanced or ambitious electronics builders. There are a number of build options – two different kinds of IR LEDs are included and you choose your motor gear ratio – and the construction gives you opportunities to show off your craftsmanship. Some Pololu engineers, for example, have been 3D-printing custom LED holders that mount onto the blade of their Zumos. The Zumo is also expandable; almost all of the I/O lines of the ATmega32U4 and the power and ground nodes are available on arrays of through-holes at the sides and front of the board, and with its low-profile design (you can remove the LCD) there is plenty of room to build on top.

While we hope we have left enough room for physical customizations, the programming, with all the sensing options, is where you can really give your robot personality and make it your own. Modulate the IR emitters for more precise opponent detection, use the accelerometer to detect a bump or a flip (sans LCD, the Zumo can drive upside down), measure distances with the encoders, measure turns with the gyros, … we are looking forward to see what you will come up with!

As we gain experience with the Zumo 32U4 robot and collect feedback from the community, we plan to release more supporting materials and offer assembled options. Our goal is to get it to the point where we can recommend the Zumo to anyone looking for a high-performance programmable robot – hobbyists, students, educators, and others – so stay tuned! Please check out the product page for more details about the robot, and take a look at our example code on GitHub.

Valentine's 3-Day Sale

Posted by Paul on 12 February 2015


Valentine's 3-Day Sale

Engage your brain as well as your heart this Valentine’s Day by picking up some of our perfectly matched pairs of products at a sweet discount. From Friday through Sunday we will have more than 100 items on sale at up to 20% off. You can find all the deals on our Valentine’s 3-Day Sale page.

New product: A-Star 32U4 Prime SV

Posted by Paul on 31 December 2014
Tags: new products
New product: A-Star 32U4 Prime SV

It has been snowing on and off today in Las Vegas, but luckily the weather was not bad enough to delay our last product release of 2014: the A-Star 32U4 Prime SV. We hope that this and the other A-Stars we released this year will help bring success to your projects in 2015. Thanks for your business and support in 2014, and Happy New Year!

The A-Star 32U4 Prime SV, our newest A-Star, is an Arduino-compatible board with a switching regulator that allows an input voltage range of 5 V to 36 V. Like the A-Star 32U4 Prime LV we released earlier this month, the A-Star 32U4 Prime SV shares the pinout and form factor of the Arduino Leonardo and should work with compatible shields.

What really sets the A-Star 32U4 Primes apart from competing products is their power supply system based on high-efficiency switching regulators, which allow plenty of power to drive your microcontroller and lots of peripherals over a large range of input voltages. The A-Star 32U4 Prime SV uses the Intersil ISL85410 1-Amp buck regulator, a more powerful relative of the regulator on A-Star 32U4 Mini SV. So you get 1 A at 5 V over most of the SV input voltage range. (We recommend an input voltage of at least 6 V.) And since a switching regulator draws less current as the voltage increases, you can get a lot more out of higher-voltage power supplies and battery packs. In a typical usage scenario, if you power your project with a 12 V battery, the A-Star 32U4 Prime SV will draw about half the current of a competing product with a linear regulator – and last twice as long on a single charge.

A-Star 32U4 Prime power distribution diagram.

Like the A-Star 32U4 Prime LV, the SV has a bunch of features designed to make it easy for you to make use of the power. The TPS2113A USB power mux allows you to safely and seamlessly switch between a battery and USB power (up to 1.5 A using a powerful enough USB supply), without the limitations of diodes or fuses. We included a handy power switch for your external power input, extra connection options in case you don’t want to use the standard DC power jack, extra access points for the important power nodes VIN, VREG, 5V, and 3V3, and big power and ground buses.

The A-Star 32U4 Prime SV includes all the same peripheral features as the A-Star 32U4 Prime LV: battery voltage monitoring, three user pushbuttons (sharing the MISO, RXLED, and TXLED lines), a buzzer optionally controlled by digital pin 6, a connector for an HD44780-based character LCD, and – on some models – a microSD card slot that works with the Arduino SD library. Here is an SV with all the optional peripherals installed:

You can purchase this configuration pre-assembled as Pololu item #3115, or get it with almost everything but the LCD as Pololu item #3114. (You can still install an LCD yourself later.) For other configuration options, please see the individual product pages below or the A-Star 32U4 Prime SV category page.

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1000:1 Micro Metal Gearmotor HPCB
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Screw Terminal Block: 3-Pin, 0.1″ Pitch, Side Entry (3-Pack)
Pololu Dual MC33926 Motor Driver for Raspberry Pi (Assembled)
BD65496MUV Single Brushed DC Motor Driver Carrier
Addressable RGB 60-LED Strip, 5V, 2m (APA102C)
Addressable RGB 120-LED Strip, 5V, 2m (APA102C)
RoboClaw 2x45A Motor Controller (V5, pin header I/O)
PIR Motion Sensor
75:1 Micro Metal Gearmotor HPCB
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